Migration trends (1/)
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Emigration

Emigrants by age

Almost 73 percent of emigrants are aged between 15 – 44. This age group only makes up about 39 percent of the entire Lithuanian population.

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Almost 73 percent of emigrants are aged between 15 – 44. This age group only makes up about 39 percent of the entire Lithuanian population. In the long run, as the number of young people is decreasing due to emigration, this causes serious demographic problems – diminishing number of marriages, decreasing birth rate, lack of workforce. A shrinking proportion of working people have to support a growing number of the unemployed.

A reverse trend is being observed when comparing the number of older emigrants and the number of Lithuania’s residents. People that are 65 or older only comprise about 1.5 percent of the total emigration flow, despite making up about 18 percent of the entire population.

Source: Statistics Lithuania. Updated: 2016-04-04

Where do Lithuanians emigrate?

For several years the main destination for Lithuanian migrants has been the United Kingdom (on average 45 percent of people who decide to leave choose this country).

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For several years the main destination for Lithuanian migrants has been the United Kingdom (on average 45 percent of people who decide to leave choose this country). Other destinations include Norway, Ireland, Germany, etc.

Source: Statistics Lithuania. Updated: 2016-04-04

Which countries have the biggest number of Lithuanians?

According to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, approximately 475 thousand Lithuanians are living abroad. The majority reside in the United Kingdom (38 percent), Canada (10 percent), Ireland (10 percent), Germany (8 percent) and Norway (8 percent.)

Source: Migration Department. Updated: 2016-04-04

Children left behind

This graphic portrays the number of children who have been assigned temporary guardianship under the request of parents when one or both of them left the country.

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This graphic portrays the number of children who have been assigned temporary guardianship under the request of parents when one or both of them left the country. According to the law, one of the parents usually remains a legal representative. But in a situation when both or a single parent leaves the country, before leaving they have to submit a request for temporary guardianship for their child to the Municipal Services of Children’s Rights Protection.

Source: State Child Rights Protection and Adoption Service. Updated: 2016-04-04

How much money emigrants send home?

In 2015 financial transfers to Lithuania from private persons living abroad amounted to 1237.62 million Euros and equaled to 3.32 percent of GDP.

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In 2015 financial transfers to Lithuania from private persons living abroad amounted to 1237.62 million Euros and equaled to 3.32 percent of GDP. In comparison, 1100 million Euros from the country’s budget where designated for social security in 2016.

Note: It is impossible to single out the remittances sent exclusively by emigrants. Therefore the number given reflects remittances in general.

Source: Central bank of the Republic of Lithuania. Updated: 2016-04-04

Immigration

Who is immigrating to Lithuania?

The vast majority of people immigrating to Lithuania are returning Lithuanian citizens (about 80 percent).

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The vast majority of people immigrating to Lithuania are returning Lithuanian citizens (about 80 percent). The bulk of foreigners that are coming to Lithuania are people from Belarus, Russia and Ukraine (approx. 10 percent). Only 3 percent of immigrants are citizens of the European Union. Most common arrivals are from Latvia, Poland and Germany. Second chart shows the top 5 EU and non-EU nationalities who immigrate to Lithuania.

Source: Statistics Lithuania. Update: 2016-04-04

Which countries are Lithuanians returning from?

Return migration is defined as return of Lithuanian citizens who have been living abroad. Almost a half (47 percent) of the returning migrants come back from the United Kingdom. Considerable amount (about 30 percent) of people also returns from Norway, Ireland and Germany.

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Source: Statistics Lithuania. Updated: 2016-04-04

Foreigners

How many foreigners live in Lithuania?

A foreigner is a person who does not possess Lithuanian citizenship. This group of people is comprised of EU citizens, non-EU citizens and stateless people.

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A foreigner is a person who does not possess Lithuanian citizenship. This group of people is comprised of EU citizens, non-EU citizens and stateless people. Approximately 41 thousand foreigners live in Lithuania. 86 percent are third country nationals: 45 percent are people who have obtained permanent residence permits (PRP), which are issued for five years. 41 percent are people who have obtained temporary residence permits (TRP), which are commonly issued for 1-2 years. Citizens of the EU and their families amount to 14 percent.

Source: Migration Department. Updated: 2016-04-04

What are the grounds for issuing a temporary residence permit?

Non-EU citizens can enter and stay in Lithuania only for purposes established by the law.

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Non-EU citizens can enter and stay in Lithuania only for purposes established by the law. The graphic shows all the temporary residence permits (TRP) issued/replaced to non-EU citizens based on admission grounds. The majority of the permits are issued on the basis of family reunification (38 percent), work (23 percent) and lawful activities (24 percent).

Source: Migration Department. Update: 2016-04-04

Where do foreigners come from?

In the beginning of 2016, the largest share of foreigners that had temporary residence permits were Ukrainian (28 percent), Russian (25 percent) and Belarusian (22 percent) citizens.

Source: Migration Department. Updated: 2016-04-04

How many foreigners work in Lithuania?

Foreigners (apart from EU nationals) that wish to work in Lithuania have to meet certain conditions. Foreign citizens can fill in vacant job openings only if there are no Lithuanian or EU professionals that meet the employer’s requirements.

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Foreigners (apart from EU nationals) that wish to work in Lithuania have to meet certain conditions. Foreign citizens can fill in vacant job openings only if there are no Lithuanian or EU professionals that meet the employer’s requirements. 8815 work migrants came to Lithuania in 2015: 6873 foreigners were issued a work permit and 1942 - a decision on conformity of Lithuanian labour market needs. The absolute majority of the work force (97 percent) were men. Most of work migrants came to work in the districts of Vilnius, Šiauliai, Klaipėda and Kaunas.

Source: Lithuanian Labour Exchange. Updated: 2016-04-04

What are the top 5 foreigner‘s professions?

815 work migrants arrived in 2015. Most of them (6729 or 76 percent) were long distance drivers.

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8815 work migrants arrived in 2015. Most of them (6729 or 76 percent) were long distance drivers. As of this moment, based on the data from the Lithuanian Labor Exchange, Lithuania lacks people of the following professions: long distance drivers, ship hull assemblers, steel construction fitters, stone masons, concrete workers, welders and tailors.

The number of foreigners that have arrived to perform jobs that require high professional qualification (people that receive the Blue Card) has increased in 2015. Qualified professionals in Lithuania usually work in the IT or educational field, manage businesses or their subdivisions. On June 1st 2016 344 foreigners lived in Lithuania that had the Blue Card, the majority being from Ukraine (103), Russia (91), Belarus (89) and USA (28).

 

Source: Lithuanian Labour Exchange. Updated: 2016-04-04

Where do labour migrants come from?

In 2015 labour migrants arrived to Lithuania from 45 countries. The vast majority of workers were citizens of Ukraine (63 percent) and Belarus (26 percent). The workforce that has been arriving from Ukraine has greatly increased in the past 5 years – from 424 in 2010 to 5596 in 2015.

Source: Lithuanian Labour Exchange. Updated: 2016-04-04

Asylum

Asylum in Lithuania: 15 years overview

Lithuania has three forms of asylum: refugee status (permanent), subsidiary protection (granted for two years with the possibility to be prolonged) and temporary protection (can be granted by the government if there is an increased number of people asking for asylum). Lithuania usually grants subsidiary protection.

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Lithuania has three forms of asylum: refugee status (permanent), subsidiary protection (granted for two years with the possibility to be prolonged) and temporary protection (can be granted by the government if there is an increased number of people asking for asylum). Lithuania usually grants subsidiary protection.

Despite the European Union experiencing the biggest influx of migrants due to the conflicts that are happening around the world, the number of asylum seekers in Lithuania in 2015 has been the lowest in the past 15 years.

Source: Migration Department. Updated: 2016-04-04

Who applies for asylum?

In 2015 there were 291 applications for asylum.

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In 2015 there were 291 applications for asylum. Most requests were received from citizens of Ukraine (22 percent), Georgia (17 percent), Russia (14 percent) and Afghanistan (11 percent).

Source: Migration Department. Updated: 2016-04-04

Who is granted asylum?

In 2015 asylum has been granted to 86 persons: 69 were granted subsidiary protection and 17 were granted the status of refugees.

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In 2015 asylum has been granted to 86 persons: 69 were granted subsidiary protection and 17 were granted the status of refugees. The most people that were granted subsidiary protection were the citizens of Ukraine, Afghanistan and Iraq. The majority of people that received refugee status were Russian, Tajikistan or Belarus citizens.

Source: Migration Department. Updated: 2016-04-04

How many asylum applicants are resettled and relocated to Lithuania?

In 2015, in solidarity with other EU member states that have been under severe pressure caused by the huge influx of migrants, the Lithuanian government adopted Resolution regarding relocation and resettlement of 1105 persons in need of international protection to Lithuania.

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In 2015, in solidarity with other EU member states that have been under severe pressure caused by the huge influx of migrants, the Lithuanian government adopted Resolution regarding relocation and resettlement of 1105 persons in need of international protection to Lithuania.  It outlined that 70 asylum seekers from Turkey will be resettled and 1035 from Greece and Italy will be relocated to Lithuania till December 31st 2017.

Source: International Organization for Migration. Updated: 2017-03-01

Irregular Migration

Refusal of entry by grounds

Irregular migration is the migration of people to a new place of residence or transit that is not in accordance with the legal norms that have been established by the sending, transit or receiving states.

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An irregular migrant can be apprehended by the police or other law enforcement officers for no longer than 48 hours. For a period exceeding 48 hours, the alien may be detained only by a court’s decision. In that case the person is transferred to the Foreigners’ Registration Centre. The graphic shows people differentiated by their citizenship that have been detained for longer than 48 hours for illegal entry or stay in the Republic of Lithuania.

Source: Migration Department. Updated: 2016-04-04

Detained migrants by citizenship

An irregular migrant can be apprehended by the police or other law enforcement officers for no longer than 48 hours.

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An irregular migrant can be apprehended by the police or other law enforcement officers for no longer than 48 hours. For a period exceeding 48 hours, the alien may be detained only by a court’s decision. In that case the person is transferred to the Foreigners’ Registration Centre. The graphic shows people differentiated by their citizenship that have been detained for longer than 48 hours for illegal entry or stay in the Republic of Lithuania.

Source: Migration Department. Updated: 2016-04-04

Return decisions and expulsion

Return means the process of a foreign who does not fulfil or no longer fulfils the conditions of legal stay in Lithuania going back to his/her country of origin.

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Return means the process of a foreign who does not fulfil or no longer fulfils the conditions of legal stay in Lithuania going back to his/her country of origin. These people can leave voluntarily given a certain period of time for voluntary departure. If they do not leave Lithuania within this time period or the period for voluntary departure cannot be given, then they are expelled from Lithuania.

The graphic portrays the number of aliens subject to a return decision and the number of people expelled from Lithuania. It is worth noting that return decisions also include obligations to leave (when foreigners are returned to other EU Member states where they can stay legally).

Source: Migration Department. Updated: 2016-04-04

How many migrants return home with IOM assistance?

For more than fifteen years the International Organization for Migration (IOM) Vilnius office provides assisted voluntary return to non-EU citizens who have found themselves in an irregular situation in Lithuania.

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For more than fifteen years the International Organization for Migration (IOM) Vilnius office provides assisted voluntary return to non-EU citizens who have found themselves in an irregular situation in Lithuania.

Assisted voluntary return aims to help migrants who are in Lithuania illegally to return to their country of origin safely and with dignity. The assistance is given to non-EU citizens, who decide to leave voluntarily but do not have financial means to leave on their own.

 

Source: International Organization for Migration. Updated: 2017-03-01